Adulting: A Parody

By Drea DiCarlo

“Adulting: A Parody” features every 90s kid’s favorite ensemble of cartoon babies, but this time in their early and mid-twenties and dysfunctional as hell. The funeral of one of their own has brought them all back together again and while they try to go through the deceased’s possessions their complicated relationships with each other begin to unfold. The room they are unpacking could almost be a child’s, full of toys and penny boards, old board games, but it’s not; beer cans litter the floor as well. It is the room of a person who never quite figured out how to grow up and whose death is an abrupt and sobering wake-up call to the others. The group is forced to examine the directions of their own lives.

The full ensemble arrives and personalities begin to clash. Affairs and secret entanglements are revealed, and everybody’s dirty laundry is aired all at once. Conflicts arise one after another in a cartoonishly soap operatic train wreck. Despite that, it still manages to be heartfelt at times; a funeral is, after all, the right place for the fakeness and niceties to fall away.

Sprinkled throughout the play are references from the original Nickelodeon show, which may go over the heads of older or younger audience members; much of the appeal comes from its nostalgia factor. It’s a lot of drama for fifty minutes, but the opening night full house loved it. And maybe that’s the point: a big, loud, grief-filled, beer-and-weed fueled romp with all your favorite characters.

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